Tags

, , , , , ,

Mia Farrow in ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ (1968)

1968_MiaFarrow_Rosemary'sBaby_capFilm Synopsis: (allmovie.com)
In Roman Polanski’s first American film, adapted from Ira Levin’s horror bestseller, a young wife comes to believe that her offspring is not of this world. Waifish Rosemary Woodhouse (Mia Farrow) and her struggling actor husband, Guy (John Cassavetes), move into the Bramford, an old New York City apartment building with an ominous reputation and only elderly residents. Neighbors Roman and Minnie Castevet (Sidney Blackmer and Ruth Gordon) soon come nosing around to welcome the Woodhouses to the building; despite Rosemary’s reservations about their eccentricity and the weird noises that she keeps hearing, Guy starts spending time with the Castevets. Shortly after Guy lands a plum Broadway role, Minnie starts showing up with homemade chocolate mousse for Rosemary. When Rosemary becomes pregnant after a mousse-provoked nightmare of being raped by a beast, the Castevets take a special interest in her welfare. As the sickened Rosemary becomes increasingly isolated, she begins to suspect that the Castevets’ circle is not what it seems. The diabolical truth is revealed only after Rosemary gives birth, and the baby is taken away from her. Polanski’s camerawork and Richard Sylbert’s production design transform the realistic setting (shot on-location in Manhattan’s Dakota apartment building) into a sinister projection of Rosemary’s fears, chillingly locating supernatural horror in the familiar by leaving the most grotesque frights to the viewer’s imagination. This apocalyptic yet darkly comic paranoia about the hallowed institution of childbirth touched a nerve with late-’60s audiences feeling uneasy about traditional norms. Produced by B-horror maestro William Castle, Rosemary’s Baby became a critically praised hit, winning Gordon an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. Inspiring a wave of satanic horror from The Exorcist (1973) to The Omen (1976), Rosemary’s Baby helped usher in the genre’s modern era by combining a supernatural story with Alfred Hitchcock’s propensity for finding normality horrific.

1968_MiaFarrow_RosemarysBaby_poster


Photo by Jeanloup Sieff Dimensions du scan 1165x1170 150ppShort Bio: (wikipedia.org)
Mia Farrow (born Maria de Lourdes Villiers Farrow; February 9, 1945) is an American actress, humanitarian, and former fashion model.

Farrow first gained wide acclaim for her role as Allison MacKenzie in the television soap opera Peyton Place and gained further recognition for her subsequent short-lived marriage to Frank Sinatra. An early film role, as Rosemary in Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby (1968), saw her nominated for a BAFTA and a Golden Globe for Best Actress. She went on to appear in films such as John and Mary (1969), Follow Me! (1972), The Great Gatsby (1974) and Death on the Nile (1978).

Farrow dated actor-director Woody Allen from 1980 to 1992 and appeared in twelve of his thirteen films over that period, most notably Zelig (1983), Broadway Danny Rose (1984), The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), Radio Days (1987), Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), Alice (1990) and Husbands and Wives (1992). Her more recent film roles include Widows’ Peak (1994), The Omen (2006), Be Kind Rewind (2008), Dark Horse (2011) and Luc Besson’s Arthur series (2006–2010).

Farrow has appeared in more than 50 films and won numerous awards, including a Golden Globe award, received seven additional Golden Globe nominations, three BAFTA nominations and a best actress award at the San Sebastian International Film Festival. Farrow is also known for her extensive humanitarian work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. She is involved in humanitarian activities in Darfur, Chad, and the Central African Republic. In 2008, Time magazine named her one of the most influential people in the world.

Advertisements