Tags

, , , , , ,

Donna Reed in ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ (1945)

1945_DonnaReed_ThePictureOFDorianGray_capFilm Synopsis: (allmovie.com)
The Picture of Dorian Gray was writer/director Albert E. Lewin’s fascinating follow-up to his expressive-esoterica masterpiece The Moon and Sixpence. Hurd Hatfield essays the title character, a London aristocrat who would sell his soul to remain handsome and young–and, in a manner of speaking, he does just that. Under the influence of his decadent (albeit witty) friend Lord Henry Wotton (George Sanders), Dorian Gray becomes the embodiment of virtually every sin known to man. The greatest of his sins is vanity: Gray commissions artist Basil Hallward (Lowell Gilmore) to paint his portrait. Admiring his own painted countenance, Gray silently makes a demonic pact. The years pass: everyone grows older but Gray, who seemingly gets younger and more good-looking every day. Hallward eventually stumbles upon the secret of Dorian’s eternal youth: he finds his painting hidden in the attic, the portrait’s face grown grotesquely aged and disfigured. Gray kills Hallward so that his secret will remain safe. Later on, Gray falls in love with Hallward’s niece Gladys (Donna Reed). Certain that Gray is responsible for Hallward’s death, Gladys’ ex-boyfriend David Stone (Peter Lawford) sets out to prove it. He is joined in this mission by the brother of dance hall performer Sybil Vane (Angela Lansbury), who killed herself after Gray betrayed her. Essentially a black and white film, Picture of Dorian Gray bursts into Technicolor whenever the picture is shown in close-up.

1945_DonnaReed_ThePictureOFDorianGray_poster


1945_DonnaReed_ThePictureOFDorianGray_poseShort Bio: (wikipedia.org)
Donna Reed (January 27, 1921 – January 14, 1986) was an American film and television actress.

With appearances in over 40 films, Reed received the 1953 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Lorene Burke in the war drama From Here to Eternity. She is also well known for her role as Mary Hatch in Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life (1946). She worked extensively in television, notably as Donna Stone, an American middle class mother in the sitcom The Donna Reed Show (1958–1966), in which she played a more prominent role than many other television mothers of the era and for which she received the 1963 Golden Globe Award for Best TV Star – Female.

Later in Reed’s career she replaced Barbara Bel Geddes as Miss Ellie Ewing in the 1984 season of the television melodrama, Dallas, and sued the production company for breach of contract when she was abruptly fired upon Bel Geddes’ decision to return to the show.

Advertisements